How To Get Out Of Thick Rough - Clarkes Golf

How To Get Out Of Thick Rough

Struggling to hit your ball out of deep rough on the golf course?

Fear not – many golfers are yet to master this escape shot, and it’s usually because the grass can snag your golf club and cause draws, hooks, and pulls. This snagging motion can also slow down your clubs, resulting in a loss of speed and power, which equates to weak hits.

Luckily, there are a few things you can do to hit a golf ball out of the rough – including simple changes to your swing.

 

7 top tips for playing out of thick rough

 

1.    Grip your club tighter

In most cases, you want to avoid gripping your clubs too tight, as this just puts more pressure on your forearms.

However, when it comes to hitting out of the rough, it’s better to have a firm hold on the golf club to ensure it doesn’t slip out of your hands. It will also prevent the club from twisting in the grass.

Check out the extensive range of golf grips on offer at Clarkes’ Golf Centre!

2.    Pull the ball back in your stance

One of the most important things to remember when hitting from deep roughs is to hit the ball before the ground – minimising the amount of grass trapped between the clubface and the ball.

With that in mind, we’d always suggest making your angle of attack steeper to ensure you hit downwards and reduce interference with the grass. It’s also worth setting up with a little extra weight on your left side than usual, to allow you to lift it out of the rough.

 

3.    Adjust your grip

If there is grass behind the ball, the clubface will close before impact, which is why you should weaken your grip ever so slightly.

To do so, place your left-hand counter clockwise to your regular position. You should see fewer knuckles on your left hand. A weaker grip will prevent the clubface from turning too much through impact, helping you to hit the ball out of the rough.

 

4.    Put more weight forward

If you’re really struggling to get that ball out of the rough, then try putting a bit more weight on your lead foot (approximately 60%).

You’re going to need to hit it quite hard, so although a decent pair of golf shoes will help you to keep your feet grounded, you also need to make sure you maintain a neutral stance with your back straight, shoulders back, and arms relaxed.

 

5.    Aim to the right of your target

Despite how hard you try, thick rough will cause the clubface to close.

Normally, we’d advise you to focus on where you need to send the ball. However, to hit from deep rough and send the ball in the right direction, we suggest aiming to the right-hand side of your intended target, allowing for a draw, hook, or slight pull.

 

6.    Hit the ball harder

When it comes to getting out of rough lies, you need to put plenty of power behind the ball.

The grass will take a lot of speed out of your club, and because of the grass trapped between the club and the ball, there won’t be any friction generated. So, don’t be afraid to strike it as hard as you can – with your weight behind your lead foot.

 

7.    Do some practice swings

If you’re really going to improve your performance on the golf course and tackle those challenging shots from the rough, then you need to put the work in.

Admittedly, you can’t be sure of how the ball will come out of the rough, but performing a few practice shots every so often will allow you to establish how the rough will interfere with your swing.

 

Need an expert opinion?

The above tips should help you to escape the trickiest of shots. However, if you have any questions about getting the ball out of the rough and how to save par, you’re more than welcome to get in touch with the team at Clarkes’ Golf Centre.

We’re always on hand to help and will gladly share our expertise. We can even assist you in choosing the best golf equipment for your game, helping you to shave strokes off your scores.

Simply give us a call on 01744 419 914 or come along and visit us at our golf superstore in St Helens. You’ll find us just off the Rainford Bypass and we’re open every day.